2016 SSAS Courses

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Session 1


(SSAS16102): Taking the Sting Out of Evaluation: Documenting Needs and Managing Accountability
David Anderson, PhD
Evaluating our short and long-term results is vital for programmatic success.  Program managers and staff want to ensure their programs and services are meeting the needs of clients, and genuinely want to improve these efforts.  Further, personnel need to justify programs and efforts, as well as to make a case for offering new initiatives, modifying or cancelling current efforts, and obtaining additional resources.  This course highlights practical skills appropriate for program managers and leaders as guidance in order to justify program expenditures, create new initiatives, garner support, and prepare accountability for efforts. Practical tools and action steps will help participants at various levels to implement appropriate monitoring and evaluation through the use of both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Participants will gain confidence in designing and implementing practical approaches through the use of planning tools and specific resources.  Participants will prepare individualized evaluation strategies suitable for implementation with varied populations in a range of settings.

(SSAS16103): Advancing the Practice: Motivational Interviewing in a New Perspective
Stephen Andrew, LCSW, LADC, CCS, CGP
This advanced level workshop allows Motivational Interviewing (MI) trained criminal justice, health care, and social service practitioners to review and expand on the practice of MI treatment approaches towards effective therapeutic interventions. This one-day training will discuss this effective approach in the treatment of substance abuse, dual diagnosis, and other challenging symptoms, and provide participants with an opportunity to explore creative ways of integrating these approaches into an effective therapeutic intervention. Participants will be offered a brief review, and practice of, Motivational Interviewing spirit and some basic skills with an overview of what's important. Participants will learn about change talk and methods of eliciting, as well as how Motivational Interviewing overlaps with other therapeutic methods. This course will provide both useful theoretical models and hands-on opportunities to improve skills.

(SSAS16104): Vicarious Traumatization: Healing the Healers
Kathryn Bedard, MA, LCADC, CMS
As helpers, we are surrounded daily by toxic emotion, trauma stories, behaviors and symptoms which can impact stress levels. We are swamped with paperwork, demands, high caseloads, and very little time with which to provide treatment. This course defines vicarious traumatization and the impact of stress by using a bio-psycho-social model. Participants will learn the appropriate steps to transform the struggle into purposeful, productive, and therapeutic interactions. This course is specifically designed for the workplace - to help us to bring back that spark of creativity and freshness that drew us into the world of helpers. The world of Recovery can be stressful on both helpers and those we serve. Learn how to bring positive intention to the work day, and be an enthusiastic team player once again.

(SSAS16105): Relapse Prevention: Using Cognitive-Behavioral and Acceptance and Commitment Therapies 
Claudia Blackburn,  MS, PsyD
Many people who relapse along the way find recovery. Relapse doesn’t determine the outcome of long term recovery. Yet, it is not a necessity nor does it define every person’s recovery path, however, it is often part of an individual’s journey toward wellness. Although the onset of a relapse is multifactorial, individuals who relapse fail to engage in coping strategies at the time - some reasons include not recognizing the need for help, feeling overwhelmed and uncertain in how to use their new coping strategies in the midst of difficulties, forgetting earliest motivations, or feeling hopeless. This training will utilize the most science-informed Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) approaches in relapse prevention. Participants will learn approaches, specific skills, and detailed interventions associated with relapse prevention. This experiential and skill-based training will go beyond the standard relapse prevention interventions, and integrate the use of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT).  Using ACT as a component of CBT, relapse prevention interventions can further enhance clients’ motivation and commitment in using relapse prevention coping strategies when facing adversity.

 (SSAS16108): The Science of Nutrition: Diet, Exercise, and Other Physical Health Variables That Impact and Inform Mental Health*
Katherine Glick, LPC, LCADC, BCHHP
This course will detail the physical health variables that impact and promote both mental health and addiction recovery.  Nutritional choices will be discussed, including dietary considerations for persons in addiction recovery, and the food-mood/gut-brain connection. Psychoneuroimmunology will be defined and discussed as it relates to nutrition and dietary choices. Special attention and focus will be placed on nutritional factors and interventions that decrease mental health and addiction symptoms and promote positive biochemical and psychological functioning.  The impact of exercise, physical stress management, and other physical health variables will be discussed and applied to mental health/addiction recovery, with a focus on creating a balanced baseline of functioning in the physical/biological/biochemical domain. Methods of proactive prevention will be highlighted within a Biophysical framework. Biophysical assessment will also be discussed, with a specific focus on motivating for change with dietary and exercise behaviors. 

 (SSAS16109): 21st Century Drugs: Modern Drugs and Micro & Macro Level Strategies
Frank Greenagel, LCSW, LCADC, ACSW, CJC, CCS
This cutting-edge, clinical presentation covers the 21st drugs: energy drinks with alcohol, synthetic cannaboids (K2, spice, space), bath salts, Adderall, Molly, buprenorphine (suboxone), hydrocodone, opana, fentanyl, and the new kind, oxycodone.  Participants will be taught the side effects, withdrawal symptoms, street names, costs, common places these chemicals are bought, legal issues around them, and strategies you can use to treat your clients.  The course will examine programs and state and federal policies that are addressing the problems caused by these substances.

(SSAS16113): Providing Trauma Sensitive Treatment for Survivors of Sexual Violence
Philip McCabe, CSW, CAS, CDVC, DRCC
Sexual violence has a devastating impact on individuals, families, communities and our society as a whole. Sexual assault may more than double the risk of substance abuse for survivors. Individuals with a history of sexual trauma need to receive ATOD treatment in a safe and supportive environment that is trauma sensitive. Addiction professionals need also to be aware of the limitations of their practice.

(SSAS16115): DSM 5: A Clinical and Pharmacological View
Diane Rullo, PhD, LCSW, LMFR, LCADC, CAP
This course will guide participants through the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual 5 for an understanding of how to diagnose utilizing the updated ICD-10 criterion sets. Discussion will include the major changes in diagnosing and the impact on clients. Pharmacological interventions that are commonly prescribed for each disorder will be presented. Alternative treatment for disorders will also be presented giving the participant a wealth of options for their patients.

(SSAS16119): New Theories of Addiction: Beyond Dopamine and the Reward Center.
Jennifer Buckman, PhD,  Fiona Conway, PhD
Addiction research is often slow to impact clinical decision making and treatment options, yet great strides have been made in rethinking how (and why) addiction develops, how (and why) it is sustained even in the face of significant negative consequences, and factors that can help or hinder long-term recovery. Current research focuses on moving past the notion that dopamine in the reward center is the sole cause of all addiction. While reward is clearly a component of addiction, this simple lens has been insufficient to understand the complexity of human addiction. In this course, several current and prominent theories of addiction will be discussed, including the 3-stage model of Koob & Volkow (2010), somatic-marker theory of Bechara (2005), and the incentive sensitization model of Robinson & Berridge (2000). Discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of each, their similarities and distinctions, as well as even newer research that may help pull the core of these theories forward more in line our ever growing understanding of the brain and behavior.


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Session 2


(SSAS16202): The Power of Groups: Group Work Using Motivational Interviewing
Stephen Andrew, LCSW, LADC, CCS, CGP
This course will provide information on how to use groups as a treatment strategy. Discussion will address why using Motivational Interviewing in a therapeutic support group format is extremely effective. Group work provides several important steps that help break isolation often experienced by a consumer. This training will provide information on the issues and treatment of special populations (adolescents, dual diagnosis, addiction, intimacy, low-income families, parents, etc.) through the use of support groups in treatment. Participants will also explore the issues of assessment, interaction, group norms, and various forms of support for the consumer and address why the therapeutic support group format is extremely effective. In addition to the role of group leader, the roles of the participants will be discussed and compared in various types of group settings, as well as the importance of therapeutic contracts, goal setting, group frequency duration, course, and process.

(SSAS16203): Self and Soul
Kathryn Bedard, MA, LCADC, CMS, and Bruce Carruth, PhD, LCSW
Two primary dynamics in recovery are (re)building a healthy sense of self and finding meaning and relevance in life. The bridge between these two dynamics is the ability to connect self with others.  Self is our roadmap for getting from where we have been, to where we are, to where we want to be. Self is the collection of our total life experience that defines who we are. It embodies such concepts as integrity, competence, generosity, empathy, self-soothing, curiosity and potency. The role of helpers is to assist those we serve as they develop a roadmap of self; using significant life events as the guideposts.  Soul is our connection to something greater than self - that mysterious inner knowing and longing that drives us forward in spite of adversity. Soul is our inner longing to seek: with map in hand, and begin the journey we call wellness and recovery. The role in helping is to help to define meaning and purpose, and trust in this inner knowing - one important thing that we can provide to those we serve is an understanding of their life’s journey in which they can honor self, and talk about the past and future while remaining fully in the present.  This course will emphasize building skills in creating an environment in which clients can explore and tell the story of their journey toward recovery, meaning and purpose; heal wounds to self and tap into the wisdom of soul.

(SSAS16204): Trauma Informed Care: Core Treatment Strategies for Counselors
Claudia Blackburn, MS, PsyD
Traumatic stress is as a formidable force that can influence and hinder our clients’ ability to implement meaningful coping strategies, to rely on personal strengths, to use support systems, and to establish safety during their treatment for addictions. Research provides strong evidence that effective treatment for substance-related disorders must address the impact of past trauma and current traumatic reactions.  In addition, studies have supported the cyclical pattern between traumatic stress reactions and substance use, whereby clients learn to self-medicate their trauma-related issues while taking additional risk of experiencing more trauma due to their ongoing substance use or relapse. Beginning with the time restraints in providing treatment to determining the necessary strategies to effectively intervene in both disorders, considerable challenges and difficult decisions exist for the client, the clinician, and the treatment program. This training provides an overview of trauma informed approaches and specific treatment interventions. The course will provide detailed strategies for each trauma-informed principle, including screening and assessment, containment, trauma awareness, safety, and support strategies, etc. A significant goal in trauma-informed treatment is avoiding retraumatization while helping the client connect the dots between his/her trauma history and their current experiences. Using evidence-based, best and most promising clinical practices, participants will have the opportunity to learn specific treatment strategies and approaches in addressing trauma and addiction across various treatment settings and at different stages of recovery.

(SSAS16207): Substance Abuse and Suicide Risk
Thomas Etts, LCSW, LCADC
This course will examine the data in which age, gender, and ethnicity impact suicidal thoughts and behaviors.  Discussion will cover three ways in which substance abuse and suicide are associated, while identifying the difference between a suicidal ideation, a suicide attempt, and non-suicidal self-injury to enhance disposition. Participants will learn about the risk and protective factors in conducting a suicide assessment and how to use screening tools specifically for gambling issues that can be contributing factors of suicide risk and ideation.  Participants will learn suicide assessment tools and methods that can be used in crisis to better address suicidality and determine a disposition plan, as well as standardized screening tools that address harmful and risky substance use which can contribute to increased suicidal thoughts and behaviors. The course will conclude with a discussion of the benefits of self-care for providers who work with clients who are at higher risk of suicide.

(SSAS16210): Creative Problem Solving Boot Camp
John Kriger, MSM, LCADC, CPS
Clients often enter treatment with limited skills to meet the challenges of recovery. Professionals often understand Substance Use Disorder and the family dynamics, but may lack the practical knowledge, experience, or variety of tools to initiate, provide, and model a wide variety of skills for creative problem solving. This highly interactive session provides a variety of strategies to help participants think differently, use more of their brain, and provides numerous approaches for assessing and generating new ideas. Unleash your brain, uncork your consciousness, and regain some of the creativity from within.

(SSAS16212): Family and Couples Therapy for Addiction Counselors
Robert Lynn, EdD, LPC
In this course, counselors will learn how to apply Family Therapy practice and theory in the assessment and treatment of families and couples focusing on drug and alcohol use with particular attention paid to adolescents and cultural issues. Drug-using behavior will be addressed as both the focus of therapeutic attention and as a symptom of challenges for therapy based on relationships within the family system. Appropriate interventions that guide families in reaching new and more productive levels of functioning will be discussed and demonstrated.

(SSAS16213): The Drug Sex Connection: Helping Clients Develop and Maintain a Healthy Sexuality in Recovery
Philp McCabe, CSW, CAS, CDVC, DRCC
Sex and drugs have a very strong connection for many clients, from increased embarrassment of sexual behavior under the influence to a link between acting on desire and the need to be intoxicated. Clients with a history of sexual victimization sometimes use ATOD to deal with pain, discomfort, or shame from the abuse. Clinicians must understand their scope, and be able to talk thorough sexual histories, conduct interventions, and support clients through integrating a drug-free experience with healthy sexual behaviors. Authentic recovery requires honesty and the sharing of our shortcomings with others. The intimacy required often leaves us feeling vulnerable when discussing the spectrum of human sexuality, including activities, behaviors, desires and fantasies, paraphernalia, and monogamous/polyamorous relationships, or in incorporating language about sexuality in treatment settings, particularly across generational or racial barriers. This is true for both the clinician and the client, and problems may go unaddressed or unexamined if discomfort keeps them from being discussed.

(SSAS16216): Understanding Your Own Cultural Influence
Megan Sullivan, LPC, LCADC
This course allows Clinicians to acknowledge how their own backgrounds, experiences, and biases impact the counseling relationship. Participants will be asked to take a very personal look at their own privilege, aspirations, and cultural blind spots.  Attention will be paid to how certain cultures traditionally view the counseling relationship and how we, as clinicians, can recognize our clients' goals.

 (SSAS16219): Clinical Supervision Enthusiasm Infusion: Advanced Skills
Alan Lyme, LCSW, ICADC, ICCS
So you’ve passed the initial hurdle: you’ve either been credentialed as a clinical supervisor or you just want to have a refresher course to keep your skills current. This fifteen hour course is for you: it fulfills half of the training requirements for re-credentialing in your state and provides you advanced knowledge and skills in supervision. This course covers advanced models of supervision, including Powell’s blended model, technology use in supervision, the Critical Reflection model, new ethical dilemmas in the digital age, and how to structure supervision for  individual growth, and learning needs of supervisees.

* This course will run from 10:30 am – 2:45 pm (it will include a lunch break)

(SSAS16220): Professional Ethics
Edward Reading, PhD, LCADC
This course will discuss the history, theory and practice of professional ethics.  A comparison of Codes for Alcohol and Drug Counselors (NAADAC), Professional Counselors (ACA), Marriage and Family Therapists (AMFT) and Social Workers (NASW) will be made.  Participants will learn how each discipline has unique insights and practices.  Participant interaction from their own discipline is expected.  All participants will review all four codes. In small groups they will compare their own discipline’s code to the code for Alcohol and Drug Counselors.

 

Certification Courses

(SSAS16301): Criminal Justice Counselor (CJC) Certification Course
Albert Kopak, PhD, Dick Talty, MA, William Hample, BS, LCADC, CJC
A substantial portion of criminal justice involved offenders report symptoms of substance use disorders (SUDs).  Research has also shown that SUDs associated with criminal activity, both before and after criminal justice contact.  This course will cover a number of topics related to SUDs in the criminal justice system, with a special focus on satisfaction of the requirements for the state Criminal Justice Counselor (CJC) certification. In addition to the class time during summer school, online content will be provided allowing participants to fulfill the full 72 hour educational requirement for the CJC in the state of New Jersey.

 

CCS Recertification:

Register for:

(SSAS16102): Taking the Sting Out of Evaluation: Documenting Needs and Managing Accountability
David Anderson, PhD
Evaluating our short and long-term results is vital for programmatic success.  Program managers and staff want to ensure their programs and services are meeting the needs of clients, and genuinely want to improve these efforts.  Further, personnel need to justify programs and efforts, as well as to make a case for offering new initiatives, modifying or cancelling current efforts, and obtaining additional resources.  This course highlights practical skills appropriate for program managers and leaders as guidance in order to justify program expenditures, create new initiatives, garner support, and prepare accountability for efforts. Practical tools and action steps will help participants at various levels to implement appropriate monitoring and evaluation through the use of both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Participants will gain confidence in designing and implementing practical approaches through the use of planning tools and specific resources.  Participants will prepare individualized evaluation strategies suitable for implementation with varied populations in a range of settings.

(SSAS16219): Clinical Supervision Enthusiasm Infusion: Advanced Skills
Alan Lyme, LCSW, ICADC, ICCS
So you’ve passed the initial hurdle: you’ve either been credentialed as a clinical supervisor or you just want to have a refresher course to keep your skills current. This fifteen hour course is for you: it fulfills half of the training requirements for re-credentialing in your state and provides you advanced knowledge and skills in supervision. This course covers advanced models of supervision, including Powell’s blended model, technology use in supervision, the Critical Reflection model, new ethical dilemmas in the digital age, and how to structure supervision for  individual growth, and learning needs of supervisees.

* This course will run from 10:30 am – 2:45 pm (it will include a lunch break)

**To meet the 30 hour CCS recertification requirement in addition to these two courses you will need to attend at least 5 hours of afternoon lectures.


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